The Don’t Come Bet in Craps

T his article assumes you’ve already read our other articles and learned the material regarding the Pass Line, Don’t Pass, and Come bets.  If you haven’t yet done so, now might be a good time to learn that material.

Don’t Come bets work similarly to Don’t Pass bets except that they’re made after the shooter establishes a Pass Line point (i.e., you make a Don’t Pass bet before the shooter establishes the point; whereas, you make a Don’t Come bet after the shooter establishes the point).  The Don’t Come bet is basically the opposite of the Come bet, just as the Don’t Pass bet is basically the opposite of the Pass Line bet.

The Flat Don’t Come bet is a self-service bet, which means you make this bet yourself by placing your chips in the Don’t Come box, which is clearly marked on the layout “Don’t Come Bar 12.”  After your Don’t Come point is established, the dealer moves your Flat Don’t Come chips to the Don’t Come rectangle on top of the square point box (refer to the figure below).

For the Odds portion of the Don’t Come bet, the dealer must position your chips for you.  Therefore, after you have the dealer’s attention, put your Don’t Come Odds chips in the Come box and tell the dealer, “Lay Odds on my Don’t Come.”  Ensure the dealer knows what you want because if he doesn’t immediately move your chips and they remain in the Come box, the crew and camera will think they represent a Come bet instead of Odds on your Don’t Come.  The dealer then moves your Odds chips next to your Flat Don’t Come bet in the Don’t Come rectangle, either bridged or heeled (refer to our article on the Don’t Pass bet for a detailed explanation and illustration on bridging and heeling the Odds bet).

The Don’t Come bet is like your own personal Don’t Pass bet that you play separately from everyone else at the table.  For example, suppose you bet the Don’t Pass at the beginning of a new game and the shooter rolls a 5 for the point.  With your Don’t Pass bet, you’re now hoping a 7 shows before a 5.  Suppose several rolls go by without a 5 or 7 appearing.  You decide to make a Don’t Come bet, so you put a $5 Flat Don’t Come bet in the Don’t Come box.  As soon as you put your chip in the Don’t Come box, the very next roll is considered the come-out roll for that specific Don’t Come bet.  Suppose the shooter rolls a 10.  The 10 becomes the point for your Flat Don’t Come bet.  If the shooter rolls a 7-out, then you win both the Don’t Pass bet and the Don’t Come bet.  If the shooter rolls a 10 before the 7, you lose your Don’t Come bet.  If the shooter then rolls a 5 before the 7, you lose your Don’t Pass bet.

As noted, when you make a Don’t Come bet, the very next roll is treated as the come-out roll for that Don’t Come bet.  The rules for winning, losing, or establishing a point on the come-out roll for a Don’t Pass bet apply the same way to the Don’t Come bet.  For example, suppose you make a $5 Don’t Come bet.  The very next roll is considered the come-out roll for your Don’t Come bet.  Suppose the shooter rolls an 11.  An 11 means nothing to everyone else at the table, but the 11 means you lose your Don’t Come bet because, as with a Don’t Pass bet, a 7 or 11 loses on the come-out.  Note that the rules for the Don’t Pass bet regarding the “Bar 12” also apply to the Don’t Come (that’s why the Don’t Come box is labeled “Don’t Come Bar 12”).

Play Craps Online for Money
Are you ready to play craps online? I recommend you play at this casino for the best online craps experience. CLICK HERE It is the casino I like to play at so not reason why you would not like it too, we are like minded!

When the game’s point is established, the dealer marks the point with the puck in the corresponding square point box.  So, for your Don’t Pass bet, the point is marked by the puck.  However, when your Don’t Come point is established, it’s marked by the Flat Don’t Come chip itself (not with another puck).  The dealer picks up the chip for your Flat Don’t Come bet from the Don’t Come box and positions it inside the rectangle at the top of the square point number box.  After your Don’t Come point is established, you can lay true odds on that Don’t Come point number, just as you can with the Flat Don’t Pass bet.

You can make as many Don’t Come bets as you want (i.e., like the Come bet, you can have as many as seven Don’t Come bets working at once).

Suppose the shooter rolls the point to end the game and a new game is about to start with a new come-out roll.  If you have Don’t Come with Odds bets on the table when a new game starts with a new come-out roll, the Odds portion of your Don’t Come bets are considered still on and working (note that this is the opposite of Come Odds bets, which are automatically off on the come-out roll for a new game).  You have the option to turn off the Odds portion of your bet, but most people choose to leave their Don’t Come Odds working on the come-out roll of a new game because everyone is typically rooting for a 7 because it’s a winner for the Pass Line.  Even though you don’t have a Pass Line bet on the table, you’re also rooting for a 7 on the come-out because it’s a winner for your Don’t Come with Odds bets.

Like the Don’t Pass bet, you can take down or turn off a Don’t Come bet at any time because after a Don’t Come point is established, the advantage switches from the house to you, so the house actually wants you to remove it.  Sometimes you’ll hear a player say, “No action,” immediately after a Don’t Come point is established.  This means the player wants to remove the Don’t Come bet from that point number but leave the chip in the Don’t Come box to make a new Don’t Come bet.  This occurs most often when a Don’t Come player doesn’t like a particular point number and doesn’t want to bet against it for whatever reason.  For example, suppose a player makes a $5 Don’t Come bet and then the shooter rolls a 6; thereby, making the player’s Don’t Come point number 6, which we know from our lesson on basic craps math, is one of the easiest numbers to make.  The player might think, “Six is an easy number to make and I’d rather wait for a harder Don’t Come point like the four or ten, so I’m going to tell the dealer no action.”  The player thinks if he waits for a Don’t Come point number of 4 or 10, he has a better chance of winning because the 4 and 10 are the hardest point numbers to make.  Remember, to win a Don’t Come bet, the shooter must roll a 7-out before rolling the Don’t Come point number.  There are only 3 ways to roll a 4 or 10, and there are six ways to roll a 7, so the Don’t Come bettor has a 2:1 chance of winning.  But the player isn’t thinking with a clear head.  Actually, he doesn’t have a clue what he’s doing.  Most likely, he’s trying to act as if he’s a craps know-it-all when, in fact, he just doesn’t get it.

As with the Don’t Pass, the house has the advantage over you on the come-out roll with a Don’t Come bet.  Then, once the Don’t Come point is established, the advantage shifts to you.  Remember, there are always more ways to roll a 7 (i.e., six ways) than there are ways to roll any of the point numbers.  So, even if the Don’t Come point is 6, which is the second easiest number to make along with the 8, the player still has the advantage after the come-out.  Therefore, it makes no sense to “no action” a Don’t Come bet after its come-out roll when you then have the advantage.  If you “no action” a Don’t Come bet after its come‑out roll, you give the advantage back to the house by having to go through another come-out roll.  The more times a player takes this “no action” approach, the greater his loss will be over the long run.  Therefore, don’t do it.

dont come betLet’s look at where the chips go on the layout when you make Don’t Come bets.  In the figure below, assume the point is 6 (see the white “ON” puck).  In this example, you’ve already made one Don’t Come bet for which the Don’t Come point of 5 was established (see the chips in the rectangle above the 5 point box).  The total bet (i.e., all those chips in that rectangle) comprises a $5 Flat Don’t Come bet and a $15 Odds bet.  With the $15 Odds bet, if it wins, you win $10.  (If you don’t remember how “laying” odds works, go back and review our article on the Don’t Pass bet.)  Since the Odds payoff doesn’t equal the Flat payoff, the Odds chips are heeled instead of bridged.  Notice that the two $5 chips are heeled on the edge of the bottom $5 chip.  So, if the shooter rolls a 7-out and your Don’t Come bet wins, you win $5 for the Flat Don’t Come (pays even money), and you win $10 for the Odds bet (pays 2:3).

In the figure above, you also have a new Flat Don’t Come bet in the Don’t Come box.  The shooter’s next roll will establish this Flat Don’t Come’s point.  When the Don’t Come point is established, the dealer moves the $5 chip from the Don’t Come box to the rectangle at the top of the square point box for the Don’t Come point.

You can now go to the page that we list the craps bets or  You can now head over to the table of contents to find more great content.

Author
Written by John Nelsen in partnership with the team of craps pros at crapspit.org.