Craps and Eleven, also known as “C&E” Bet

T he Craps and Eleven, also known as “C&E,” is a proposition bet on one roll that adds the Eleven to the Any Craps.  The “C” portion of a C&E is exactly the same as the Any Craps.  Unlike the other proposition bets in the center section that are labeled with rectangles, the C&E is labeled on the layout with 16 sets of two circles for the “C” and the “E” (i.e., eight sets are at both ends of the table).  The 16 sets of circles are enough to accommodate the 16 players that can fit at a craps table, with each set corresponding to a specific player position.  The stickman is in charge of controlling all C&E bets (i.e., not a self-service bet).

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The C&E is two distinct bets, one on the Any Craps and one on the 11.  Although the numbers you bet for the C&E are the same as for the Horn (i.e., 12, 11, 3, and 2), there’s a subtle difference between the two bets.  The Horn is four distinct bets and the payoffs are based on those individual bets (i.e., none of the four numbers are combined to give a combined payoff).  Conversely, the Any Craps part of the C&E combines the 12, 3, and 2 into a combined payoff of 7:1.  You’re probably asking, “If the Horn and C&E bets are on the same four numbers, should I make a Horn bet or a C&E bet?”  Good question.  In my opinion, the best way to answer this is to simply compare their house advantages.  The C&E has a house advantage of 11.1% while the house enjoys a whopping 12.5% for the Horn.  Clearly, neither bet is smart unless you like giving your money to the casino (in which case, you might as well donate it to CrapsPit.org!).  But if you twisted my arm and forced me to make one of them, I’d go with the C&E because of the lower house edge.  Besides, I’d only have to toss in $1 for a C&E bet (i.e., a fractional bet of 50 cents each on the C and the E); whereas, I’d have to give up $4 for the Horn (i.e., $1 each on the 12, 11, 3, and 2).

The C&E payoff is 7:1 if the shooter throws a 12, 3, or 2; and 15:1 if she throws an 11.  Remember, it’s a one-roll bet so it either wins or loses on the roll immediately after you make the bet.

The C&E bet presents a similar kind of math teaser as the Horn when the bet amount results in a fractional amount for the Any Craps portion and the 11 portion.  The difference between the math teasers for the Horn and the C&E is that the net payout when you win the C&E is always a whole-dollar amount so you don’t have to worry about the casino keeping any remainder (i.e., there never is a remainder for the C&E).  If your bet amount is even (i.e., divisible by 2), then the stickman simply divides the bet amount by 2 and puts an equal amount on the C and E circles.  If your bet amount is odd (not divisible by 2), then the fractional bets for the C and E always end up with a net payoff in a whole-dollar amount.  It doesn’t matter if you make a $1, $9, or $103 C&E bet, the payoff will always be a whole number, so you don’t have to worry about the casino pocketing any remainder.  Don’t believe me?  Let’s do the math for a $1 C&E bet as an example.

A $1 C&E is a fairly common bet.  The $1 C&E means you’re really making a 50-cent bet on the Any Craps and a 50-cent bet on the 11.  The stickman can’t divide your $1 chip into two equal amounts (i.e., the denominations for craps chips don’t come in cents), so he positions your chip on your set of C&E circles by straddling them.  This straddle indicates a “fractional” bet such that half your bet is an Any Craps bet and the other half is a bet on the 11.

If an Any Craps appears (i.e., a 12, 3, or 2), then you win $3.50 because the payoff is 7:1 (i.e., $0.50 multiplied by 7 = $3.50).  But the other half of the $1 chip is on the “E,” which in this case is a loser because an 11 didn’t appear.  So, the stickman must subtract $0.50 from the $3.50 that you won for Any Craps.  $3.50 – $0.50 = $3.00.  The two fractional 50-cent bets net a $3.00 payoff to you (i.e., a whole number with no cents).  Let’s check the payout results for when the shooter rolls a winning 11.

c e craps betIf the 11 shows, you win $7.50 because of the 15:1 payoff (i.e., $0.50 multiplied by 15 = $7.50).  But the other half of the $1 chip is on the “C,” which in this case is a loser because a 12, 3, or 2 didn’t appear.  So, the stickman must subtract $0.50 from the $7.50 that you won for the 11.  $7.50 – $0.50 = $7.00.  The two fractional bets give you a net payoff of $7.00, which is once again a whole number.

Refer to the figure to see how the stickman straddles your C&E bet if your bet amount is an odd number.  In the example in the figure, assume you tossed a $5 chip to the stickman and said, “C&E, please.”  The dealer couldn’t divide your $5 chip into two equal whole-number amounts, so he straddled the “C” and “E” circles with your chip.  Straddling indicates that half your bet is applied to the “C” (Any Craps) and half your bet is applied to the “E” (Eleven).

You can now go to the page that we list the craps bets or You can now head over to the table of contents to find more great content.

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Written by John Nelsen in partnership with the team of craps pros at crapspit.org.

5 Comments on “Craps and Eleven, also known as “C&E””

  1. What about the winning 50-cent bet itself? If the craps part of the C&E pays 7:1, wouldn’t you be entitled to $3.50 in winnings less the losing eleven bet plus the original $.50 craps bet? That would make $3.50 (rounded down to $3.00).

    1. Bill, thanks for your post. Your question basically answers itself. Let’s break it down. With a $1 C&E bet where $0.50 is on the Any Craps and $0.50 is on the 11, an Any Craps winner pays $3.50 at 7:1 (therefore, the first part of your question is true; yes, you are entitled to $3.50 in winnings). With an Any Craps win, the 11 part of the C&E bet loses, so you lose $0.50 (therefore, the second part of your question is true; yes, you lose the 11). The third part of your question is also true, “…plus the original $0.50 craps bet” (i.e., the original $1 chip remains on the table as a new C&E bet, unless you tell the dealer to take it down). The $0.50 loss for the 11 is accounted for in the net payout to you. So, you get your net payout (i.e., $3.00) and the original $1 chip remains on the table as a new C&E bet for the next roll (i.e., that original $1 chip now comprises the $0.50 you get to keep for the original $0.50 Any Craps bet that you won, and a new $0.50 bet on the 11). Remember, the $0.50 loss for the 11 is taken out of your net payout, so that’s how the original $1 chip remains on the table for a new C&E bet on the next roll, unless you tell the dealer to take it down. Let’s look at it another way. Suppose the casino actually has $0.50 chips, so you toss the dealer two chips (i.e., total $1) and tell him you want to bet the C&E. The dealer puts one $0.50 chip on the “C” and the other $0.50 chip on the “E.” The shooter rolls a 12. The dealer takes down the $0.50 chip for your losing Eleven (the casino now owns that chip). Then, the dealer pays you $3.50 for your winning Any Craps and he leaves your original $0.50 chip on the table as a new Any Craps bet (you currently own that chip). (NOTE: It’s common practice for most casinos to leave the winner on the table as a new bet unless you specifically tell him to take it down.) Although the dealer usually leaves the winning chip on the table as a new bet, let’s suppose for this example that he takes it down and gives it back to you with your winning payout. So, the net amount in your hand is $4.00 (i.e., $3.50 for your winning payout + plus your original $0.50 chip for your winning Any Craps = $4.00). Now, let’s look at the net when the dealer leaves your original $1 chip on the table. The dealer pays you $3.00 (not $3.50 as in the example above) because he subtracts the $0.50 portion of the losing Eleven. Your original $1 chip stays on the table as a new C&E bet (you currently own that $1 chip). So, the $3.00 payout + $1 on the table = $4.00. In both examples, your net amount is $4.00. I suspect that your confusion is simply because of the fact that, typically, the dealer subtracts the losing 11 from the payout and then leaves the original $1 chip on the table as a new C&E bet. Yes, this game can get confusing, but if you break it down as I did above, then everything begins to make sense. Good luck and have fun at the tables!

  2. You bet a dollar on the C & E. I thought the payout on C is 3 x 2, if you want the E bet to be left on? I thought the payout on E is the 7 x 2, if you want the C bet to be left on. What am I missing from your payout answer? Where are you getting 7:1 and 15:1?

    1. Chgodon, thanks for your question. It sounds like you have the same question as another of our guests. Rather than repeating the same answer, we refer you to the question that our guest, Bogus_Bill, sent to us. It’s located below on this article about the C&E bet. In our response to Bogus_Bill, we go into great detail to explain the payout. Make sure you click the “see more” link to reveal our entire response. Let us know if that doesn’t answer your question. Thanks for visiting the Crapspit, and good luck at the tables!

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