The Come Bet in Craps

C ome bets work like Pass Line bets, but the key difference between the two is that you make a Pass Line bet before the shooter establishes a point; whereas, you make a Come bet after the shooter establishes a point.  Generally, people find the Come bet a bit confusing at first, so don’t fret if you find yourself thinking, “What is this guy talking about?”  At the end of the article, we’ll go through a short scenario that brings it together so it makes sense.

Click HereAfter a point is established, the game continues until a decision is made by either rolling a 7-out or the point number.  The Pass Line point applies to everyone at the table who makes a Flat Pass Line bet.  The Come bet is different in that it’s like your own personal Pass Line bet that you play separately from everyone else.  For example, suppose you bet the Pass Line at the beginning of a new game and the shooter rolls a 5 for the point (i.e., your Pass Line point is 5).  Suppose several rolls go by without a 5 or 7 appearing.  You decide to make a Come bet, so you put a $5 Flat Come bet in the Come box.  As soon as you put your chip in the Come box, the very next roll is considered the come-out roll for that specific Come bet.  Suppose the shooter rolls a 10.  The 10 becomes your point for your Flat Come bet.  So, now in this example, you have the 5 as your point for your Pass Line bet, and you have the 10 as your point for your Come bet.  If the shooter rolls another 10, you win your Come bet.  However, if the shooter rolls a 7, you lose both your Pass Line bet and your Come bet.

The Flat Come bet is a self-service bet, which means you make this bet yourself by placing your chips in the Come box directly in front of you.  After your Come point is established, the dealer moves your chips from the Come box to the square point number box for your Come point number.

Like the Flat Pass Line bet, you can take Odds on the Flat Come point.  Unlike the Pass Line Odds bet where you position the chips yourself behind the line, the dealer must position the Come Odds bet for you.  Simply put your Come Odds chips in the Come box and tell the dealer, “Odds on my Come.”  The dealer then takes your chips and places them on top of your Flat Come bet, slightly offset.  The slight offset indicates that the top portion of the chip stack is the Odds bet and the bottom portion is the Flat bet.

As noted, when you put your chips in the Come box for a Flat Come bet, the very next roll is treated as the come-out roll for that specific Come bet.  The rules for winning, losing, or establishing a point on the come-out roll for a Pass Line bet are the same for the Come bet.  For example, suppose you make a $5 Come bet.  The very next roll is considered the come-out roll for your Come bet.  Suppose the shooter rolls an 11.  An 11 means nothing to everyone else at the table, but the 11 means you win $5 for your Come bet because, as with a Pass Line bet, a 7 or 11 wins on the come-out.

When the Pass Line point is established, the dealer marks the Pass Line point with the puck in the corresponding square point box.  However, when your Come point is established, it’s marked by the Flat Come chip itself (not with another puck).  The dealer picks up the chip for your Flat Come bet from the Come box and positions it inside the square point number box.  After your Come point is established, you can take true odds on that Come point number, just as you can with the Flat Pass Line bet.

You can make as many Come bets as you want.  In fact, if the shooter is rolling lots of numbers (other than the dreaded 7), you could have as many as seven Come bets working at the same time (i.e., it’s possible to have a Come bet on each of the six point numbers and one in the Come box).

See the figure below for an illustration of where Come bets are positioned on the layout.  Assume the point is 6 (see the white “ON” puck).  Assume you’re in player position #3.  (I intentionally omitted the player positions from this figure as a test to see if you remember them from our other articles.  Note that the positions of Come bets inside the square point boxes correspond to the player positions.  In this example, you’re in player position #3, and your chips are positioned accordingly.  Hint: If you forget the player positions, remember that I said earlier in this article to put the Flat Come bet chip in the Come box directly in front of you.  In the figure, notice where the $5 Flat Come bet is positioned in the Come box and this will give you a hint as to where you’re standing at the table in player position #3.)  In this example, you’ve already made three Come bets for which Come points were established (i.e., the 4, 9, and 10), and you’ve taken Odds on those three Come point numbers.  Each Come bet comprises a $5 Flat Come bet and a $5 Odds bet.  The Odds portion is identified by the offset $5 chip on top of the $5 Flat bet chip.

Also in this example, you have a new Flat Come bet in the Come box.  The shooter’s next roll will establish this Come’s point.  When the Come point is established, the dealer moves the $5 chip from the Come box to the point box, at which time you can take Odds on the new Come point.

come bet in craps

If you have Come with Odds bets working on the come-out roll of a new game (i.e., the shooter made his point to end the previous game, so the next roll is the come-out roll for a new game), the Odds portions of your Come bets are considered automatically off (i.e., not working and not in play).  However, the Flat portions are considered on (i.e., working and in play).  (Yes, I know this is confusing, but hang in there, we’re almost to the scenario.)  If the shooter rolls a 7 on the come-out for a new game, the Flat Come bets lose but you don’t lose the Odds bets.  In this case, the dealer returns the Odds portions of your Come bets to you, and he keeps the Flat portions.  If the shooter rolls a point number on the come-out for which you have an already established Flat Come with Odds bet, only your Flat portion wins because the Odds portion is considered automatically off for the come-out roll of a new game.  (Wow, I know that sounded really confusing.  You might want to read that paragraph again.)

You can decide to make your Come Odds working on the come-out roll of a new game simply by telling the dealer, “My Come Odds are working on the come-out.”  The dealer will then put a small button labeled “ON” on top of your Come Odds bets.  Then, if the shooter rolls a 7 on the come-out, you lose both the Flat portions and the Odds portions of your Come bets because you told the dealer you wanted the Odds in play on the come-out.  If the shooter rolls a point number for which you have an established Come with Odds bet, you win both the Flat and Odds portions because you told the dealer your Come Odds are working on the come-out.

If you make a new Come bet and the shooter rolls a point number for which you already have an established Come bet, you win the established Come bet and your new Come bet moves into the point box to replace it.  For example, suppose you make a $5 Come bet and the shooter rolls a 6.  Your Come bet chip moves to the 6 point box.  You then make another $5 Come bet and the very next roll is another 6.  You win the first Come bet that was established when the first 6 appeared on the prior roll, so the dealer removes the first Come bet with winnings and puts it in the Come box for you to pick up.  The dealer then moves your second Come bet into the 6 point box.  That seems like an awful lot of work for the dealer to remove your winning first Come bet and then replace it with your second Come bet.  So, if your second Flat Come bet is the same amount as your first one, the dealer typically leaves the chips in their place and just pays your winnings.  Rather than removing your first Come bet and then replacing it with your second Come bet, the dealer saves time by leaving everything in its place and just paying your winnings, which he places next to your second Come bet chip in the Come box.  This called “off and on.”  As the dealer pays your winnings, he says something like, “Off and on for eleven dollars.”  Don’t forget to pick up your winnings; otherwise, the dealer thinks you’re adding them to your next Come bet.

Come bet is just like a Pass Line bet but is made after the shooter establishes a point.

I know this sounds terribly confusing, so let’s run through a scenario to make Come bets easy to understand.  Trust me, it is, indeed, easy!  Don’t give up on the game just because it’s confusing at first.  Remember, a Come bet is just like a Pass Line bet but is made after the shooter establishes a point.  Think of Come bets as your own personal Pass Line bets independent of the shooter’s Pass Line point.  (If you need to review our other article on the Pass Line bet, now might be a good time to do it.)

1.  A new shooter prepares to make a come-out roll for a new game.  You make a $5 Flat Pass Line bet.  The shooter rolls a 10; therefore, the point for this game is 10.  You feel a bit bold, so you take $15 in Odds on the point behind the line.

2.  After a point is established, the only numbers that matter for Pass Line bets are 7 and the point number.  The shooter rolls a 4.  The number 4 doesn’t matter, so the game continues.

3.  You think maybe it’s time to make your first-ever Come bet.  You bite your lip and think for a moment, “Man, I hope I do this right cuz I’m going to look really stupid if I do it wrong.”  You grab a $5 chip from your stack and fiddle with it in your hand because you’re nervous.  The stickman is ready to push the dice to the shooter for her next roll.  You think, “What the heck, let’s do it.”  You quickly place the $5 chip in the Come box directly in front of you just as the stickman pushes the dice to the shooter.

4.  The shooter rolls an 11.  For your Pass Line bet, an 11 doesn’t matter.  For your Flat Come bet, this roll is treated as the come-out roll, so an 11 on the come-out roll for your Come bet wins.  The dealer places a $5 chip (pays even money) next to your Flat Come bet chip.  Pick up your winnings, but leave the original Come bet chip there because you want to make another Flat Come bet on the next roll.

5.  The shooter rolls a 5.  For your Pass Line bet, a 5 doesn’t matter (remember, the Pass Line point for this game is 10).  For your Come bet, this roll is treated as the come-out roll, so your Come point is 5.  The dealer moves your Flat Come bet chip to the 5 point box.  You decide to take $6 in Odds on your Come point, so you place $6 worth of chips in the Come area and tell the dealer, “Six dollar Odds on my Come, please.”  The dealer takes your $6 in chips and places them on top of your $5 Flat Come bet, slightly offset.  The offset indicates that the top portion of the chip stack ($6) is the Come Odds, and the bottom portion ($5) is the Flat Come.

6.  The shooter rolls a 3.  For both the Pass Line bet and the Come bet, a 3 doesn’t matter.  The game continues.

7.  The shooter rolls an 8.  For both the Pass Line bet and the Come bet, an 8 doesn’t matter.  The game continues.

8.  The shooter rolls a 10 (i.e., her Pass Line point).  The game is over.  “Winner, winner, chicken dinner!”  The shooter’s point showed before a 7, so your Pass Line with Odds bets win.  The dealer pays you $5 for your Flat Pass Line bet (pays even money) and $30 for your Odds bet (pays 2:1, or $30 for your $15 bet).  Pick up all your Pass Line winnings but leave your original $5 Flat bet on the Pass Line because a new game is about to start and you want to make another Pass Line bet.  For your Come bet, a 10 on this roll doesn’t matter, so nothing happens with your Come bet.  Because the shooter rolled her Pass Line point of 10 to end the game, a new game is about to start.  For the come-out roll of a new game, only your $5 Flat Come bet is working (i.e., your $6 Come Odds that are sitting on top of your Flat bet are automatically off and not working).

9.  The shooter rolls a 7 on the come-out for this new game.  7 is a natural, so the game ends immediately.  For the Pass Line on the come-out, 7 is a winner.  Your $5 Flat Pass Line bet wins $5 (pays even money), so the dealer places a $5 chip next to your Pass Line bet.  Pick up your winnings, but leave your original $5 chip on the Pass Line because a new game is about to start.  For your Come bet, a 7 showed before your Come point of 5, so you lose your Come bet.  But, since this was the come-out roll for a new game, you lose only the Flat portion of your Come bet.  The dealer returns your $6 Come Odds to you by placing them in the apron directly in front of you (don’t forget to pick up your chips), and then the dealer takes and keeps the $5 Flat Come bet.  So, since your Come bet lost, you now no longer have a Come bet.  The only working bet you now have is the $5 Flat Pass Line bet for the next new game.

10.  The same shooter rolls a 6 on the come-out roll for the next new game; therefore, the point for this game is 6.  You take $5 in Odds on the point behind the line.  You decide to make a Come bet, so you place a $5 chip in the Come box.

11.  The shooter rolls an 8.  For your Pass Line bet, an 8 doesn’t matter.  For your Come bet, 8 becomes your Come point, so the dealer moves your Come bet to the 8 point box.  You place another $5 chip in the Come box and tell the dealer, “Five dollar Odds on my Come, please.”  The dealer positions your $5 chip on top of your $5 Flat Come bet, slightly offset.

12.  The shooter rolls a 12.  For both your Pass Line bet and Come bet, a 12 doesn’t matter.  The game continues.

13.  The shooter rolls an 8.  For your Pass Line bet, an 8 doesn’t matter (remember, the Pass Line point is 6).  For your Come bet, the shooter rolled your Come point before a 7, so you win.  Woohoo!  The dealer removes your Come with Odds bets and places them in the Come box.  He then pays your winnings, which are $5 for your Flat Come (pays even money) and $6 for your Come Odds (pays 6:5).  Pick up all your winnings and your original Flat Come with Odds bets.  Now, since your Come bet won and you picked up all your chips, the only bets you have on the table are the Pass Line with Odds bets.

14.  The game continues, and you continue raking in the money.  You think, “James Bond ain’t got nothing on me!”

Let us know if you just can’t make sense of the Come bet.  Contact us with your questions and we’ll respond as soon as we can.  Don’t give up on the game just because you think it’s too confusing or too much trouble to learn.  Craps is like learning to add 2 + 2, it’s kind of hard at first, but once you get used to it, it’s easy as pie.

You can now head over to the table of contents to find more great content.

Author
Written by John Nelsen in partnership with the team of craps pros at crapspit.org.
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  • jerome f

    if you have several come bets working and the point is made before the next roll can you say off on the come bets or do you have to have them working